The squeaky wheel – Idiom Thaatha

Squeaky wheel

The meaning of the idiom The squeaky wheel gets the grease is to emphasize that care and attention would usually be given to problems that are more noticeable.

Examples:

1. All the departments are in need of funds for the forthcoming campaign. The meteorological department’s head had been talking consistently about this to the Director of finance before he received the funds. It is a case of the squeaky wheel getting the grease.

2. In a typical example of the squeaky wheel gets the grease, the first year hostel students were allowed to go home for the weekend because of their constant nagging.

A lick and a promise – Idiom Thaatha

A lick and a promise

The meaning of the idiom a lick and a promise is to wash or clean something swiftly and carelessly.

Examples:

1. The man at the water service centre did a lick and a promise of my motorcycle and spent his time watching the cricket match.

2. The maid in the manor was relieved of her duties since she continued to do a lick and a promise of the dishes after lunch, despite repeated warnings.

Play ducks and drakes – Idiom Thaatha

Play ducks and drakes

 

The meaning of the idiom to play ducks and drakes is to be frivolous with something.

Examples:

1. The sales of the company plummeted when the manager of operations started playing ducks and drakes with the sales team.

2. To play ducks and drakes with studies at the final year of studies is considered a serious issue.

Malleable – Vocabwagon

Malleable

The meaning of the word Malleable is to be easily led astray, influenced and to be pliable.

The word Malleable is an adjective.

Examples:

1. The young chap in the group was vulnerable and malleable – easily falling prey to the wily schemes of the seductress.

2. Youngsters are malleable and can easily be guided with ease towards both the good and the bad ways.

Hit the nail on the head – Idiom Thaatha

Hit the nail

The meaning of the idiom to hit the nail on the head is to describe exactly the cause of a problem or a situation.

Examples:

1. The porter hit the nail on the head when he pointed out the cause of the wet baggage as a broken bottle.

2. The mechanic hit the nail on the head as soon as he opened the bonnet of the car.

Intrepid – Vocabwagon

Intrepid

The meaning of the word Intrepid is to be fearless and adventurous.

The word Intrepid is an adjective.

Examples:

1. Peter’s intrepid nature made him the natural  choice amongst all for the post of the local sheriff in the thieving town of Lowdale.

2. Intrepid people often find that adventures come in search of them rather than their bold nature making them seek reckless excitement.

 

Hackneyed – Vocabwagon

Hackneyed

The meaning of the word Hackneyed is to be overused, unoriginal, vapid, trite or worn out.

The word hackneyed is an adjective.

Examples:

1. Roy lost the election because his hackneyed ideas could not match with the modern thought process of the young lawyer competing against him.

2. One of the suggestions given by a great writer was to avoid a hackneyed plot line and bring in fresh ideas.

 

 

Busman’s holiday – Idiom Thaatha

Busman's holiday

The meaning of the idiom busman’s holiday is to do in a holiday what a person does regularly at work.

Examples:

1. The city bus driver’s vacation turned to busman’s holiday as the driver of the car in which he was travelling became ill suddenly.

2. The mountaineering volunteer’s biking ride turned into busman’s holiday as his bike rolled off the stand and down the hill.

Chicanery – Vocabwagon

Chicanery

The meaning of the word Chicanery is to attain one’s purpose using deceptive methods.

The word Chicanery is a noun.

Examples:

1. His rise as a tremendous power in the field of politics was mainly due to chicanery.

2. Put aside your tricks of chicanery and concentrate on dealing fairly with everyone.

Lackadaisical – Vocabwagon

Lackadaisical

The meaning of the word Lackadaisical is to be carelessly lazy and to lack enthusiasm and determination to do any work.

The word lackadaisical is an adjective.

Examples:

1. His lackadaisical attitude paved the way for his ruin.

2. Lackadaisical behaviour in a child must be corrected in early stages to help the child be active and responsible.