Winged Post

Pococurante – Vocabwagon

Pococurante

The meaning of the word Pococurante is to be unconcerned/lackadaisical or indifferent.

The word Pococurante is an adjective.

Examples:

1. The pococurante attitude of the student irked the faculty to the extent of the student being suspended for a week.

2. Although Thomas looked pococurante from the outside, he was in fact concerned about the welfare of the poor.

A lady’s privilege – Idiom Thaatha

Lady's privilege

The meaning of the idiom it is a lady’s privilege to change her mind is the toleration of a changed or reversed decision when done by  a woman more readily than when done by a man.

Example

1. We expected the manager to be angry with Nancy when she informed him of her inability to join with us for the appraisal meeting at the last moment. To our surprise, the manager was calm. We decided that it must be the case of a lady’s privilege to change her mind.

Plaudit – Vocabwagon

Plaudit

The meaning of the word Plaudit is praise or words of appreciation.

The word Plaudit is a noun.

Examples:

1. The drummer was extremely happy as the plaudits from the audience took a long time to stop.

2. Our boss has received plaudits for his exceptionally good governing skills.

A flea in one’s ear – Idiom Thaatha

 

a flea

The meaning of the idiom A flea in one’s ear is a sharp and severe scolding of a person.

Examples:

1. The naughty child was sent with a severe lecture that served as a flea in his ear.

2. The unexpected and harsh answer of the boss was a flea in her ear.

Ramification – Vocabwagon

Ramification

The meaning of the word ramification is a complex or unpleasant consequence of an action or event.

The word ramification is a noun.

Examples:

1. The shock of the loss in business was severe for him as he had never stopped by to consider the ramifications of his new investments.

2. The potential ramifications of his classmates vanished into thin air the moment he became the president of the school.

Be tickled pink – Idiom Thaatha

Be tickled pink

The meaning of the idiom be tickled pink is to be extremely amused, pleased or to be delighted.

Examples:

1. He would be tickled pink if he knew that I have purchased a collection of his favourite comedian, Charlie Chaplin.

2. My dog Bugs, was tickled pink when I gave him a second stick of dried beef.

Equanimous – Vocabwagon

Equanimous

The meaning of the word Equanimous is to be calm and composed without being ruffled.

The word Equanimous is an adjective.

Examples:

1. The captain’s equanimous behaviour on the field increased the morale of the players who were facing a tough time from the opposite team.

2. The manager’s inability to remain equanimous at times of trouble and pressure led to his employees losing confidence in him.

 

No idle jest – Idiom Thaatha

No idle jest 1

The meaning of the idiom no idle jest is a verbal delivery uttered with serious intention which should never be misunderstood as a joke or an exaggeration.

Examples:

1. Larry told his brother that it would cost more than a thousand dollars if he were to undertake that journey astride his British Motorcycle. Larry was laughed at. But it was no idle jest. His brother ended up spending nearly two thousand dollars at the end of the journey.

2. The police commissioner warned the students of a baton charge. Many students who did not heed the warning saw  too late that it was no idle jest as the police came charging like bulls.

 

The squeaky wheel – Idiom Thaatha

Squeaky wheel

The meaning of the idiom The squeaky wheel gets the grease is to emphasize that care and attention would usually be given to problems that are more noticeable.

Examples:

1. All the departments are in need of funds for the forthcoming campaign. The meteorological department’s head had been talking consistently about this to the Director of finance before he received the funds. It is a case of the squeaky wheel getting the grease.

2. In a typical example of the squeaky wheel gets the grease, the first year hostel students were allowed to go home for the weekend because of their constant nagging.

A lick and a promise – Idiom Thaatha

A lick and a promise

The meaning of the idiom a lick and a promise is to wash or clean something swiftly and carelessly.

Examples:

1. The man at the water service centre did a lick and a promise of my motorcycle and spent his time watching the cricket match.

2. The maid in the manor was relieved of her duties since she continued to do a lick and a promise of the dishes after lunch, despite repeated warnings.